Our neighborhoods

Douglas County

Sarpy County

Making our neighborhoods

Everyone lives in a neighborhood. But sometimes it can be tricky to define that area.

Is it your block? Your subdivision? Or something broader?

For this project, we carved counties into neighborhood areas to help zero in on real estate sales and valuation trends in a specific, identifiable area. Our neighborhoods usually are bigger than a single subdivision and smaller than a ZIP code. We've tried to strike a balance between narrow areas that lack enough properties to show a trend and large areas that don't provide meaningful information about where you live.

We drew the lines based on natural boundaries, major streets and traditional neighborhood definitions. We considered factors such as school attendance zones, neighborhood associations and Census population groupings. In the end, we had to use our best judgment.

Each neighborhood is identified by a short name that reflects a key landmark, elementary school or major subdivision. That might not be what you call your smaller neighborhood, but in many cases, we list additional names of subdivisions, parks or schools that help describe each neighborhood.

Let us know how we did. And tell us if you think there are other names that can help describe the neighborhoods we've outlined. We plan to polish this effort as we go forward.

Use our data

We're providing our neighborhood boundaries for free download and opening up our boundaries API (application programming interface). We're exposing some of our basic data - the boundaries themselves and Census stats.

The files are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. That means you can use them, but you have to share your results. Hopefully, you can create something else neat.

PostGIS .sql file: Download

Shapefile: Download